FRANK WATERS BOOKS

 

A list of books by, about, and associated with Frank Waters

Book of the hopi

In this strange and wonderful book, thirty elders of the ancient Hopi tribe of Northern Arizona—a people who regard themselves as the first inhabitants of America—freely reveal the Hopi worldview for the first time in written form. The Hopi kept this view a secret for countless centuries, and anthropologists have long struggled to understand it. Now they record their myths and legends, and the meaning of their religious rituals and ceremonies as a gift to future generations. Here is a reassertion of a rhythm of life we have disastrously tried to ignore and instincts we have tragically repressed, and a reminder that we must attune ourselves to the need for inner change if we are to avert a cataclysmic rupture between our minds and hearts.In this strange and wonderful book, thirty elders of the ancient Hopi tribe of Northern Arizona—a people who regard themselves as the first inhabitants of America—freely reveal the Hopi worldview for the first time in written form. The Hopi kept this view a secret for countless centuries, and anthropologists have long struggled to understand it. Now they record their myths and legends, and the meaning of their religious rituals and ceremonies as a gift to future generations. Here is a reassertion of a rhythm of life we have disastrously tried to ignore and instincts we have tragically repressed, and a reminder that we must attune ourselves to the need for inner change if we are to avert a cataclysmic rupture between our minds and hearts.

Mexico mystique

In Mexico Mystique Frank Waters draws us deeply into the ancient but still-living myths of Mexico. To reveal their hidden meanings and their powerful symbolism, he brings to bear his gift for intuitive imagination as well as a broad knowledge of anthropology, Jungian psychology, astrology, and Eastern and esoteric religions. He offers a startling interpretation of the Mayan Great Cycle — our present Fifth World — whose beginning has been projected to 3113 B.C., and whose cataclysmic end has been predicted by 2011 A.D.

The man who killed the deer

The story of Martiniano, the man who killed the deer, is a timeless story of Pueblo Indian sin and redemption, and of the conflict between Indian and white laws; written with a poetically charged beauty of style, a purity of conception, and a thorough understanding of Indian values.

THE WOMAN AT OTOWI CROSSING

Based on the real life of Edith Warner, who ran a tearoom at Otowi Crossing, just below Los Alamos, The Woman at Otowi Crossing is the story of Helen Chalmer, a person in tune with her adopted environment and her neighbors in the nearby Indian pueblo and also a friend of the first atomic scientists. The secret evolution of atomic research is a counterpoint to her psychic development.

In keeping with its tradition of allowing the best of its list to thrive, Ohio University Press/Swallow Press is particularly proud to reissue The Woman at Otowi Crossing by best-selling author Frank Waters. This new edition features an introduction by Professor Thomas J. Lyon and a foreword by the author's widow, Barbara Waters.

The story is quintessential Waters: a parable for the potentially destructive materialism of the mid-twentieth century. The antidote is Helen Chalmer's ability to understand a deeper truth of her being; beyond the Western notion of selfhood, beyond the sense of a personality distinct from the rest, she experiences a new and wider awareness.

The basis for an opera of the same name, The Woman at Otowi Crossing is the powerful story of the crossing of cultures and lives: a fable for our times

 

OF TIME AND CHANGE

Details the life of the author and other members of the earliest artistic community in Taos, New Mexico
 

PUMPKIN SEED POINT

Frank Waters lived for 3 years among the strange, secretive Hopi Indians of Arizona and was quickly drawn into their mythic, timeless reality. Pumpkin Seed Point is a beautifully written personal account of Waters' inner and outer experiences in the subterranean world.


 

THE EMERGENCE OF FRANK WATERS

By embracing the full storytelling and archetypal potential of the American Southwest, Frank Waters wrote some of the finest literature of the 20th century. Through his 28 volumes of fiction and non-fiction, including Book of the Hopi and The Man Who Killed the Deer, Waters' achievement as both a novelist and a philosopher is comparable to Hermann Hesse, John Steinbeck, and Terry Tempest Williams, a rare accomplishment in the literary world. As James Thomas, editor of Best of the West, states: "Waters is now ... on the cutting edge of just about everything we take seriously in this country: the natural environment, our socio-psychological environment ..., our political relationship with the past, and our political, ecological, and spiritual relationship with the future."
The Emergence of Frank Waters A Critical Reader serves as an essential introduction to Frank Waters' life, work, and sociocultural contexts for scholars and general readers alike. In its 23 essays, this volume thoroughly explores Waters's visionary novels and non-fiction books, writings that are vital to understanding our transformational times.
Born on July 25th, 1902, in Colorado Springs, Frank Waters began his twenty-eight book career in 1930 with The Lizard Woman, a novel set on the Mexican border. For the next six decades, he would go on to write many classics of fiction and non-fiction, including The Man Who Killed the Deer (1942), Masked Gods (1950), Book of the Hopi (1963), Pike's Peak (1971), and Mountain Dialogues (1981). Along the way, Waters engineered the first phone lines across the Mojave, wrote film scripts for Hollywood, edited a bilingual newspaper in New Mexico, penned public relations releases for Nevada's nuclear test range, and taught university level creative writing classes in Colorado. Waters received numerous honors in his lifetime, including the New Mexico Arts Commission Award for Achievement and Excellence in Literature, seven honorary doctorates, and the declaration of "Frank Waters Day" by New Mexico Governor Bruce King in 1993. Frank Waters died in his home in Arroyo Seco, New Mexico on June 3, 1995.



 

A FRANK WATERS READER

Over the course of his life, Frank Waters amassed a body of work that has few equals in the literature of the American West. Because his was a writing that touched every facet of the Western experience, his voice still echoes throughout that region's literary world.

Swallow Press is especially proud to present this generous sampling of Frank Waters's writings. A Frank Waters Reader encompasses the full range of his work and draws from both his nonfiction and his many novels. It stands as a testament to his singular achievement and proof of the talent that established him as the foremost writer in the Southwest.

This collection spanning forty years of writing provides an excellent introduction for the uninitiated as well as a retrospective for those already familiar with this giant talent. His gift for achieving a delicate balance among the many contrary forces at work in the land and the people who inhabit it is as true and enduring as the region that inspired him.


 

people of the valley

One of Frank Waters’s most popular novels, People of the Valley takes place high in the Sangre de Cristo mountains where an isolated Spanish-speaking people confront a threatening world of change.

 

to possess the land

Ambitious and only 24 years old, Arthur Manby arrived from England in the Territory of New Mexico in 1883, and saw in its wilderness an empire that he believed himself destined to rule. For his kingdom, he chose a vast Spanish land grant near Taos, a wild 100,000 acres whose ancient title was beyond question. Obsessed, he poured more than 20 years into his dream of glory, and schemed, stole, lied, cajoled, begged, and bribed to take the vast grant from its rightful owners. With great mastery, Waters draws us into this obsession, and the intense drama of these years is at once psychological and historical. In May 1913, Manby came at last to possess the grant, but within three years it had slipped again from his grasp.

The story does not end there, and perhaps only Frank Waters could have portrayed the strange disintegration of Manby’s personality as he aged, his frantic but ingenious efforts to regain “his” land. Among these was the creation of a secret society which terrorized whole towns and villages, becoming so powerful that even Manby no longer knew all its members and workings. At the same time he turned deeper inward, locked and bolted his gates against the outside world which hated and feared him more than ever. On July 3, 1929, a swollen, headless body was discovered in Manby’s Taos home. Some said it was murder; others swore the body was not Manby’s; still others reported seeing him alive afterward. The story blazed into national headlines and an official inquiry followed. Step by step, Waters takes us into the web of strange clues, evidence, more murders and complications—an investigation which the New Mexican government inexplicably called to a halt. The case remains the West’s greatest unsolved mystery.


 

Masked gods

Masked Gods is a vast book, a challenging and profoundly original account of the history, legends, and ceremonialism of the Navaho and Pueblo Indians of the Southwest. Following a brief but vivid history of the two tribes through the centuries of conquest, the book turns inward to the meaning of Indian legends and ritual — Navaho songs, Pueblo dances, Zuni kachina ceremonies. Enduring still, these rituals and ceremonies express a view of life, of man's place in the creation, which is compared with Taoism and Buddhism — and with the aggressive individualism of the Western world.

 

FRANK WATERS: MAN AND MYSTIC

“In addition to his accomplishments as a talented novelist, a thorough historian, and an excellent essayist, Frank Waters is that rare breed of man who has merged heart and mind early in his life and moved forward to confront ultimate questions. This dilemma of faith and heritage, religion and identity, and commitment and comfort has never been resolved intellectually. Even with profound faith and rigorous discipline of self, mystics have found it difficult to resolve through action and prayer. … I look at the life and writing of Frank Waters … and find … a remarkable journey of inquiry spanning nearly a century and illuminating questions which I did not think possible to formulate.”

—Vine Deloria, Jr., editor

Contributors to this volume are Alvin M. Josephy, Jr., Bobby Bridger, Steven Wall, Will Wright, William Eastlake, Larry Evers, David Jongeward, Max Evans, Win Blevins, Barbara Waters, Rudolfo Anaya, Thomas J. Lyon, Joe Gordon, Robert Kostka, Charles Adams, Father Peter J. Powell, Quay Grigg, Alexander Blackburn, and T. N. Luther.


 

THE ERP BROTHERS OF TOMBSTONE

The Earp Brothers of Tombstone and the famous fight at the O. K. Corral are well known to American history and even better known to American legend. This composite biography of Wyatt, Morgan, Virgil, James, and Warner Earp is based on the recollections of Mrs. Virgil Earp, dictated to the author in the 1930s, and amplified by documents he unearthed in 1959. In his review of the book for Library Journal, W. S. Wallace stated that he considered The Earp Brothers of Tombstone "the most authoritative account ever to be published on the subject."



 

PURE WATERS

The novels and nonfiction work of writer Frank Waters stand as a monument to his genius and to his lifetime quest to plumb the spiritual depths that he found for himself in the landscape and people of his beloved Southwest. In a career spanning more than half a century, he shared, through his many books, his insights and discoveries with countless readers across the globe.

Now, drawn from rare editorials, speeches, and essays that Frank Waters authored over the years as a reflection and a formation of his life-long themes, Pure Waters provides a treasure trove of exciting new material from this giant of the American Southwest.

In celebration of the centenary of his birth, Swallow Press is pleased to offer this new collection by one of its bestselling and most inspiring authors.
 

THE COLORADO

The vast Colorado River collects water from the highest Rocky Mountain peaks and traverses the widest plateaus, the deepest canyons, and the lowest deserts before emptying into the delta of northern Mexico. This austere land and mighty river resist exploration, settlement, and description. But in the hands of one of the West's great writers, Frank Waters, the history and lore of its past make irresistible reading and a resounding case for mankind's respect for the environment.

 

THE YOGI OF COCKROACH COURT

In this novel of the mestizo, or mixed-blood, Frank Waters completes the Southwestern canvas begun in The Man Who Killed the Deer and People of the Valley. Set in a violent Mexican border town, the story centers on Barby, a tormented mestizo, Guadalupe, the mestiza “percentage-girl,” and Tai-Ling, the serene yogi. Their fates mingle though each remains alone—Barby bound to the brute rages of the night; Guadalupe unconscious of all save the sun of her sexuality; Tai-Ling believing it is possible to transcend completely the flow of life.
 

MIDAS OF THE ROCKIES

Frank Waters’ dramatic and colorful 1937 biography of Winfield Scott Stratton, the man who struck it rich at the foot of Pike’s Peak and turned Cripple Creek into the greatest gold camp on earth. More than regional history, Midas of the Rockies is a story so fabulously impossible and yet so painfully true that it commends itself to the whole of America, the only earth, the only people who could have created it.

 

THE DUST WITHIN THE ROCK

Based on one of the most significant periods in Frank Waters's own life, Pike's Peak is perhaps the most complete expression of all the archetypal themes he explored in both fiction and nonfiction.

In The Dust within the Rock, the third book in the Pikes Peak saga, an aging Joseph Rogier clings to his vision of finding gold in the great mountain and his grandson Marsh comes of age in the Rogier household. It is the early part of the twentieth century, in Colorado Springs, and the schoolhouse, the newsstand, the railroad, the mines—all become part of the younger man's emergence into adulthood and self-discovery.

Waters's powerful and intuitive style transforms the tale into a mythic journey, a search for meaning played out in the drama of everyday living on the vast American frontier.

Pike's Peak (1971) is composed of three condensed novels: The Wild Earth's Nobility, Below Grass Roots, and The Dust within the Rock. Some years after its publication, an interviewer asked Frank Waters whether it was autobiographical. “Yes,” he replied, “and no.”


 

CUCHAMA AND SACRED MOUNTAINS

W. Y. Evans–Wentz, great Buddhist scholar and translator of such now familiar works as the Tibetan Book of the Dead and the Tibetan Book of the Great Liberation, spent his final years in California. There, in the shadow of Cuchama, one of the Earth’s holiest mountains, he began to explore the astonishing parallels between the spiritual teaching of America’s native peoples and that of the deeply mystical Hindus and Tibetans. Cuchama and Sacred Mountains, a book completed shortly before his death in 1965, is the fruit of those explorations.

To Cuchama, “Exalted High Place,” came the young Cochimi and Yuma boys for initiation into the mystic rites for their people. In solitude they sought and received guidance and wisdom. In this same way, the peoples of ancient Greece, the Hebrews, the early Christians, and the Hindus had found access to inner truth on their own holy mountains: and in this same way must the modern person find the path to inner knowing.

Surveying many of the most Sacred Mountains in North America, South America, Europe, and Asia, Evans–Wentz expresses the belief that the secret power of these high places has not passed away but only awaits the coming of a New Age. This new age, in accord with the oldest prophecies of our continent, will be a time of renaissance, the long–waited era of harmony and peace among all peoples.

This renaissance shall be uniquely American, a renewal based on the values so long honored by the Americans before Columbus, and so ruthlessly trampled by the “civilized” Europeans who overran them. No other race of people has been as spiritual in their way of life than the original Americans, notes Evans–Wentz. Perhaps none other has known such martyrdom. Yet the secret greatness of the Indian religion still lives, ancient as the Earth itself, yet ageless in its power to renew.



 

LIFE WITH THE LITTLE PEOPLE (FRANK WATERS MEMORIAL PUBLICATION)

Folktales. Mythology. With illustrations by Chester Scott. In LIFE WITH THE LITTLE PEOPLE, Robert Johnson Perry weaves history, traditional information, family stories and his own fiction to create a facinating look into the magical world of the Little People...Follow him into this world. You will be enthralled. (--Gayle Ross) After a career as a chemical engineer, Perry, a Chickasaw Indian, was able to devote his time and energy to writing, dedicating himself to recording many of the stories passed on to him by Native American elders from various tribes. These stories are both fantastical and entirely possible. It's not so much that 'little people' exist, writes Perry in his introduction, or even that herbs were used, it's that simple faith is enough for healing to occur. The book is a magical reading experience for any reader, or, as we Muskogeans say--'Felep ah gez oschee!'--they'll have a really good time. (--Will Hill, Kabitcha Feke Seko)


 

WINTER IN TAOS (FW FOREWARD) MABEL DODGE LUHAN

With no chapters dividing the narrative, Luhan describes her simple life in Taos, New Mexico, this "new world" she called it, from season to season, following a thread that spools out from her consciousness as if shes recording her thoughts in a journal.

 

DESERT WIFE (FW INTRODUCTION) HILDA FAUNCE

"This is the compelling narrative of the wife of an Indian trader in the desert wilderness of the Navajos before World War I. No other book about life at such trading posts equals its revealing portrayal of the land and the people, and its implication of the racial differences still confronting us today."—From the introduction by Frank Waters
 

TRAVESTY: FRANK WATERS’ ERP AGENDA EXPOSED BY S.J. REIDHEAD

In this book the author sets out in detail to "...expose the misstatements and twisted facts that Frank Waters wrote..." in his 1961 book: "The Earp Brothers of Tombstone: The Story of Mrs. Virgil Earp".

BELOW GRASS ROOTS

In Below Grass Roots, the second book in Frank Waters's Pikes Peak saga, turn-of-the-century Colorado Springs is prospering with the mining boom and a growing tourist industry. Patriarch Joseph Rogier becomes ever more obsessed with the treasures of the towering mountain and tries to enlist his son-in-law Jonathan Cable in his mining schemes. Cable instead leaves for Navajo country with his young son. Rogier, convinced that new wealth lies deep within the mountain, below grass roots, sinks his mines and what remains of his fortune ever deeper into the mountain's granite.

DEEP WATERS BY ALAN LOUIS KISHBAUGH

In the late 1960s, while heading up the Western operations for Farrar, Straus & Giroux, Alan Kishbaugh met the distinguished writer Frank Waters in Taos, New Mexico. From 1968 until Waters's death almost thirty years later, the two wrote each other hundreds of letters. This annotated collection of their correspondence reveals Waters's profound engagement with the land and cultures of the Southwest.
A lively introduction to the breadth of Waters's work, Deep Waters touches on themes of ecology, philosophy, pre-Columbiana, Eastern philosophy, Egyptology, American Indians, and a host of other subjects reflecting the great cultural shifts occurring at the time. Kishbaugh and Waters write of the women in their lives, mutual friends, writing and publishing challenges, and newly discovered books. Their letters offer new views of the legendary writers' colonies of Santa Fe and Taos and the arrival of the counterculture in New Mexico.

 

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